Tuesday, September 9, 2008

Potential issue with Ivermectin

We aren't certain, what we first thought was an infection in Ebony, could be a "hypersensitivity" to Ivermectin. At less than a week old, we gave her Ivermectin along with the rest of the herd, just has we have done with other crias. She crashed a few days later. Since she was exhibiting neurological symptoms, (non responsiveness, trembling) the vet treated her as though she had an infection in the brain. Her prescription was a regimen of IV fluids, antibiotics and B vitamins. "Ebony" revived and thrived after that.

Until this Sunday, three days after her next shot of Ivermectin. Similar neurologic- like symptoms--appearing listless and non-responsive, kushing whenever she could and walking stiffly. I checked my records and figured out the timing of her symptoms was very similar to her first dose of Ivermectin-about three days. We began the same regimen, in case it was an infection, but already by today she is doing MUCH better. The vet said that if she responds quickly to discontinue antibiotics because it most likely is a hypersensitivity.

"Hypersensitivity to Ivermectin" is well documented in certain breeds of dogs--mainly collies. It produces neurological symptoms and can be fatal but more often is not. The vet and a physician confirmed that it was a possibility it was a sensitivity even though she had not seen it before.

If it were an outright allergy--the reaction would have been immediate.

To read more about this in dogs--check out this reference. I couldn't find anything about it in alpacas. Just reminds us of how little we know about these animals and how important it is to share knowledge and support research.

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1 Comments:

At September 10, 2008 at 11:43 PM , Anonymous Able Oaks Ranch Alpacas said...

THanks for the heads-up on ivermectin, but that is not the same as ivermec. So for that particular alpaca, are you going to use dectomax instead?

Best regards,
Virginia Lyons

 

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